Discography

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  • Ep
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14
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13
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12
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11
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10
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09
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08
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07
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06
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05
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04
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03
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02
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01
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00
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99
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98
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97
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96
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95
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94
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93
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92
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91
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Chemical Chords



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Artwork

Artwork


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Tracks
01 Neon Beanbag
02 Three Women
03 One Finger Symphony
04 Chemical Chords
05 The Ecstatic Static
06 Valley Hi!
07 Silver Sands
08 Pop Molecule [Molecular Pop 1]
09 Self Portrait With ?Electric Brain"
10 Nous Vous Demandons Pardon
11 Cellulose Sunshine
12 Fractal Dream Of A Thing
13 Daisy Click Clack
14 Vortical Phonoth?que



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Information
Today marks the release of Chemical Chords, the new album from Stereolab. It is also their 4AD debut.

As The Wire recently said "a new Stereolab album can sometimes feel intensely needed," and with Chemical Chords (the eleventh album in an illustrious career), this rings true.

Chemical Chords began life in early-2007 when Tim Gane started messing with ?a series of about seventy tiny drum loops? on top of improvised chord sequences using piano and vibraphone. ?Building them up from there ? later slowing the tracks down or speeding them up ? a totally new way of doing songs for us??

With typical prolificacy, the band laboured over the summer at their studio, Instant Zero (in Bordeaux, France), helping transform these blueprints into thirty two luminous new songs, with keyboardist/technician Joe Watson manning the mixing desk. Half the new repertoire was selected for this album, which, for all the breathless spontaneity of its invention, is arguably the band?s
tautest, most highly focused work this century.

According to Tim Gane, it's a collection of ?purposefully short, dense, fast pop songs,? brimming with Motown-like drums, O?Hagan?s finest baroque-pop brass and string arrangements and etched with some of Sadier?s most eloquent, mellifluous vocal performances to date. It is, nonetheless, classic Stereolab; like all their best work, a perfect equipoise between an implausibly cool past and a shamelessly exotic future.


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